Vegetable garden update

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There are many way to support tomatoes. I went with the pole approach. I tied up cord, one fore each plant and secured it at the bottom with a rock. Twisty ties, string and like to tie the branches and stems of the tomato plants for support. I chose the hottest time of day to do this job. Hot. Hot. Hot. Do not do as I did. All done now. Let’s see if it works.
Ignore the weeds. You can see that I have. I am going for imperfect gardening this year. If a job gets done it’s a bonus. If it doesn’t get done. Never mind. I got a bee sting on my stomach today! Ouch!

Wheel on barrow

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Sounds like an English pub name, Wheel on Barrow, a drinking establishment in Barrow-in-Furness harking back to the days of wooden carts and straw on the floor. A runaway cart carrying ale could have crashed into the pub beginning the name Wheel on Barrow. I digress. No wonder I don’t get into the garden.  Blame the barrow!

The warmer weather is beckoning me outside. The hurdle that has stopped me from getting outside earlier was the wheel on the wheel barrow. It was flat. As flat as could be. It made me feel flat. Today I got out the bicycle pump and tackled the annoying job. Did it take hours to fix? Was the tyre punctured? No and no. It took five minutes at most. Boy do I feel satisfied. It really is the small things that matter.

On with the garden tidy up so I can get the vegetable garden ready, the outdoor seating area comfortable and the weeds under control.

Now that I’m on an active streak, I will try and do a little something each day. I have a very daring female blackbird that stalks me closely when I’m pulling out weeds and sweeping up leaves. I can almost touch her, she gets so close. She is a welcome garden companion.

Did you know: Female blackbirds aren’t black!

Vegetables Six Weeks On

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Notice the eaten silverbeet at the front of the photo. I am sharing my vegetables with others.

Red Shiso:
Flowering stage. I will wait till the flowers have died and collect the seeds.
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Beetroot:
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Beetroot Closeup:
I think they can come out next week.
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Flat Leaf Parsley:
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Silverbeet/Swiss Chard:
Having a hard time competing with the other plants and is growing very slowly.300313i
Kale:
A very unusual leaf shape. Non uniform curves.
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Vegetables: Four Weeks On with Thoughts

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KALE:
White flying bugs like to live on the underside of the leaves. If I spray the underside with water they don’t like it and die or leave. This natural technique needs to be repeated as it is far from perfect to remove every bug. They have returned but in smaller numbers.

SILVERBEET/ SWISS CHARD:
Takes its time to grow and appears to be last out of the gate in the race. But it may just be a turtle. Maybe it doesn’t like the neighbouring plants? Not sure yet.

BEETROOT:
Beautiful green foliage, looking very healthy. Need to divide the plants better as I can see three beetroots squashing each other. Do I leave them together or remove two? Is it too late to transplant again? One plant recovering from being eaten by sparrows.  Looking forward to using the beetroot greens in juicing.

FLAT LEAF PARSLEY:
Starting to show growth finally, a slow starter. Healthy and not favoured by insects or birds.
I still have not labelled parsley correctly, I wrote celery instead. They look similar when young.

SPINACH:
Leaves were being eaten at night or early morning by unknown culprits. Sparrows were observed and disturbed mid munch. Thanks to the suggestion by the “unorthodox epicure” to sprinkle cayenne pepper on the plants to deter the birds. Experiment worked. Plants not in the photograph. Recovering from being eaten prematurely by sparrows.

SHISO, GREEN AND RED:
Starting to take off now with new growth. They have taken a while to get used to their new location. Patience is paying off.

Waiting for the rain to come before expanding the garden. Ground too hard to transplant plants that I want to move elsewhere. Compost seems to be doing its job well.

Getting rid of agapanthus

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What a pile of roots. Agapanthus might look nice but when you want to remove them from the garden they doesn’t go nicely. They are hostile. The garden bed where I removed them from is shown below but there is still work to be done with removing the broken roots. The ground is hard, the soil void of any goodness. There is much to do to the soil before I plant my blueberries. What would be a nice companion plant for blueberries?
I worked up a sweat digging these agapanthus out. That was part of my exercise regime that day. No wonder they say back breaking work. There are more to be dug out but I am taking a small section at a time and focusing on that. I cannot wait to get a car load and take the plants off to the green waste at the refuse station. I want to see the back of them.
I do confess to liking the miniature agapanthus and they are welcome in my garden for now. I do however detest their giant cousins.
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